In 1970, the Nobel prize winner Milton Friedman shared his belief that 'there is one and one only social responsibility of business: to use its resources to engage in activities designed to increase its profit.' This idea was built on in 1976 by two finance professors who proposed that there was an inherent conflict with business between the executives and the shareholders and proposed that to solve the problem, the goals of executive and shareholder should be aligned by compensating the executive through shares in the company. How depressing! In his fascinating book Fixing The Game, Roger Martin explains how the...
By Darryl Cooke Jack Welch, the former CEO of GE and once described as the greatest CEO in history, saw people as the ultimate answer to boosting productivity and taking an organisation to a higher level. He felt that there was no limit to what people can do and to what can be achieved. Or, as he described it, 'unlimited juice in the lemon'. Welch called this view of life 'stretch', which soon became a way of life at the company. No longer would the company set modest goals and celebrate mediocrity. Instead, the company would ask, 'How good can you be?'...

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